Saturday, February 25, 2006

What. A. Bunch. Of. (Put your own derogatory term here.)

This kind of thing is why I'm glad I don't live in Barbados any more... this is the 21st century, people! From the Nation website:

Whether you call him cowboy or, facetiously, cowgirl, the image of the rugged westerner riding tall in the saddle may never be the same again.
The controversial movie Brokeback Mountain depicting a love relationship between two men on a fictional location in Wyoming, United States, premiered at Olympus Theatres on Wednesday to "favourable attendance".
But though the film has been given the green light from the local censorship board, not everyone is fully behind the move.
President of the Caribbean Baptist Fellowship, Pastor Vincent Wood, told the WEEKEND NATION yesterday though he had not seen the movie, anything that promoted a lifestyle counter to the word of God could not be condoned.
He said the Bible might not mention the word "homosexuality" but it was clear on the subject of men sexually consorting with men.
"So whether it is a movie or dramatic presentation, I can't support its showing," he said.
Senior Minister of Mount Zion Missions, Reverend Lucille Baird, stressed she was a strong opponent of any sexual relationship which was not heterosexual.
"I have to stand by the word of God. The film should not be shown. Right now we are devastated and we are agonising over losing our children with the violence in schools and the like.
"How much more can the children take without us losing the entire generation?" she asked.
Baird added: "If we keep exposing them to these things we will soon send them into oblivion. I am not saying you can protect them from exposure to everything, because you have the internet. But do not bring extra stuff to violate the young people that we are trying to save."
Phil Harden, chief executive officer of Olympus Theatres Incorporated, said he had not received any negative feedback on the showing of the film.
"If anyone voices any sort of negative opinion, I welcome it. I think it is important that everyone gets to express their views, including the makers of this film," he said, adding he had no qualms whatsoever in showing the "fantastic" movie.
But manager of the Globe Cinemas, Azard Ali, wants no part of Brokeback Mountain. He said he did not think Barbadians would support the movie.
"I have heard about it. If we show it we will get a lot of licks from the public. I don't think the public likes those movies. I remember when we showed the movie Rent the people got on real bad – they quarrelled with us," he said.
Chairperson of the Film Censorship Board, Senator Pat Parris, said based on the Film Censorship Act the movie was viewed and rated "A" for adults. She said this rating was arrived at because the movie contained sexual scenes, nudity and strong language.
"Parents should be responsible and ensure their children do not go to the cinema to watch the movie. The cinema owners should also ensure that they are not allowed into the cinemas. We [the board] will also police it," she said, adding this was the case for all "A" rated movies.
Brokeback Mountain has already been banned in some Muslim nations, created controversy in conservative American states such as Utah and has been heavily criticised in Jamaica.
It cost BDS$28 million to make and has so far grossed BDS$232 million worldwide. It has been nominated for eight Academy awards, including Best Picture.


At least no one's been killed over it. Yet.

1 comment:

The Archivist said...

"Parents should be responsible and ensure their children do not go to the cinema to watch the movie. The cinema owners should also ensure that they are not allowed into the cinemas. We [the board] will also police it," she said, adding this was the case for all "A" rated movies.

If it were a 'normal' "A" rated movie, I'd bet that no one would be saying that. They're only saying it now because it's Brokeback Mountain.

Could be wrong, but I kind of get that impression from it.